Editor:  Toru Nakagawa 
(Professor Emeritus, Osaka Gakuin Univ.)
Last Updated:
  April 12, 2015
http://www.osaka-gu.ac.jp/php/nakagawa/TRIZ/eTRIZ/eC/

   visits since Sept. 1, 2014

(1) Everything is interesting!
(2) Watch and find it!
(3) Think 'Why?'.
(4) Learn how it works.
(5) Understand the function.
(6) Think for yourself.
(7) Imagine the ideal.
(8) Collect different examples.
(9) Try to devise something new!
(10) Information for teachers and parents


Editor: Toru Nakagawa 
(Professor Emeritus, Osaka Gakuin Univ.)
http://www.osaka-gu.ac.jp/php/nakagawa/TRIZ/eTRIZ/

Top page ; This page in Japanese
for Children and Highschool students for Students and the General public for Engineers (Introduction) for Practitioners

 

General Index  (A) Editorial (B) References Links News & activities Software tools (C) Papers, case studies, articles, Lectures, course materials   (D) Forum General Index 
Home Page New Information for children and highschool students for students and the general public for engineers (introduction) for Practitioners CrePS System Documents USIT Manual & Case Studies WTSP (World TRIZ Sites Project) Search in this site Home Page

 


Introduction (Toru Nakagawa, Sept. 27, 2014): 

This page is for you, children and young people from kindergarten to high schools. I am planning to post various interesting and easy articles for you to find 'Think and Try' is exciting and useful.

Though a part of this page is still under construction, I have just posted here a list of selected articles posted already in this site.  Most of them are written for big brothers and sisters in highschools and colleges.  I wish to post new articles, from now on, easier and suitable for children and highschool students, under the support of many authors.

Please feel free to write an email to me about your questions, impressions, thoughts, requests, etc.

 

Let's enjoy 'Think & Try' !:  Entrance Page for Children and Highschool students 

Intended Contents of this Entrance Page

I wish to write an introductory article containing the items shown at the top of this page.  But it seems to take so much time, ...

 

Table of Contents of this Entrance Page

Since there are a number of articles posted already in this Web site and containing some parts of intended items, I have decided to arrange the selected ones here in the following framework: (Note: Mar. 27, 2015)

Introduction for Children and Highschool Students  [Part 1]  (Articles are not ready)

(1) Everything is interesting!

(2) Watch and find it!

(3) Think 'Why?'.

(4) Learn how it works.

(5) Understand the function.

(6) Think for yourself.

(7) Imagine the ideal.

(8) Collect different examples.

(9) Try to devise something new!

(10) Information for teachers and parents

 

Pages Written for Children and Highschool Students [Part 2]

Articles
written originally for children and highschool students.

(Sorry but only few articles posted so far)

 

Pages originally written for elder people but still suitable for younger readers of this page 

(A) General Introduction:  mind sets, etc. 

(B) Introduction to methods of problem solving 

(C) Simple examples of solving familiar problems 

(D) Documents 

 

 

Top of this page For Children Selected Articles General Introduction Problem Solving Methods Examples Documents Japanese Page

 


Entrance Page for Children and Highschool students  (a list of selected articles and new ones)  [Part 2]

Note:  This section shows you a list of selected articles which are good and suitable for you, children and highschool students.  Articles written by prominent authors, teachers, and students/children yourselves will be posted here.  Please send me your manuscripts.  Since various articles may cover several aspects of (1) through (10) shown above, they are arranged here in a different way.  New articles will be shown with a   mark,

 

  TRIZ Anime:  TRIZ Tales Animation (in 9 languages) produced by TETRIS Project

Click here    and select your language by use of the flag icons at the bottom left, then go ahead to see 5 movies (for 3 - 4 minutes each) by clicking the icons at the right.

(1) TETRIS TRIZ Introduction - The History of TRIZ: From the universal law of gravitation to TRIZ

(2) TRIZ Tale I:  Nina at School - A world of problems

(3) TRIZ Tale II:  Nina at the University - Exam time

(4) TRIZ Tale III:  Nina at Work - Being creative at work since the very first day

(5) TRIZ:  Theory of Inventive Problem Solving

Note for teachers:  The TETRIS Project is a project supported by the European Committee for TRIZ education at school; please see some more detail in the pages  (Oct. 12, 2009).  The animation may be shown in 9 languages including English and Japanese. It is accessible in the official web site of the TETRIS Project, and even more smoothly in our web site (operated on the OGU server).

  Why Water Striders can stand and slide on the Water?: A Summer Homework by Son and Father with TRIZ (Taichiro & Katsuya Miyanishi) (Apr. 21, 2009)

A 12-year old boy, Taichiro, talked to his father: 'As a summer homework, I want to learn why water striders can stand and slide on the water surface'.  So his father, Katsuya, guided him. They tried to think of various ideas for standing on the water surface, with reference to various phenomena and effects.  Then they checked their ideas at the library, and further built toy models of water striders with the materials available at home. The boy's toy model worked better than the father's.  At the end of their Symposium presentation, the boy made a video talk and said 'I enjoyed the work very much and found the TRIZ thinking process interesting'. 

Note for teachers:  This work was presented at Japan TRIZ Symposium 2008, with the slides both in Japanese and in English.  Father is an engineer in an IT industry and learned TRIZ just half a year before this work, and applied the TRIZ way of thinking to this problem.  It is interesting that their work is neither a book/internet survey of knowledge, nor observation of the facts, but rather idea generation and verification on the basis of TRIZ thinking.  This presentation won the First Place of the Presentation Award according to the votes by the Symposium participants.  Congratulations!!  This is a monumental work where TRIZ was actively used by a 12 year boy in Japan. 

 A Large Variety of Writing Instruments: Studying the Evolution of Technologies in Familiar Items (Kurumi Nakatani and Toru Nakagawa) (Nov. 12, 2010)

Students of my seminar class have surveyed a large variety of writing instruments and classified them with respect to their writing mechanisms.  The students also listed up various needs/usages of them and evaluated different writing mechanisms with respect to their usages.  These examples demonstrates how technical things evolve towards better and better in various aspects.

Note for teachers:  This paper reports the activities at Nakagawa's Seminar Class of 2nd year students (of 10 members) at Faculty of Informatics, Osaka Gakuin University.  The class was designed to study basic TRIZ concepts without using TRIZ terms nor TRIZ tools.  Nakagawa gave no lectures but questions and tasks to the students, and the students answered them, made exercises and a report together.  This way of learning would be applicable to even younger students (of age over 10). Nakatani, a student, gave a presentation at Japan TRIZ Symposium 2010, while Nakagawa at ETRIA TFC 2010. 

TRIZ Textbooks: CID Course for Children:
Course of Creative Imagination Development (CID) based on TRIZ: Methodical Guide-Books and Children Workbooks for Three Grades (Natalia V. Rubina, 1998-1999 (in Russian); English translation: Irina Dolina, Technical Editing: Toru Nakagawa 2000-2002) 
   (Posted: Jan. 30, 2001 - Feb. 17, 2002)

Here is a full set of Children Workbooks on 'How to imagine and think creatively'.  It consists of 6 booklets, to be used in the 6 semesters from 1st Grade up to 3rd Grade.  The course is taught in an optional/voluntary class once every week. While playing with riddles and cards you are guided to the world of imagination and ideality.  Creative imagination is an important skill you can use for solving difficult problems in future as a citizen or as an engineer, for example.

Note for teachers:  CID (Creative Imagination Development, or sometimes spelled as RTV from its Russian acronym) was originally developed by G. Altshuller as a part of TRIZ and emphasizes the importance of imagining some new ideas or dreams, and addresses to engineers for invention as well as to children.  The present course material contains 6 booklets of Methodological Guide-Books for teachers besides the 6 booklets of Workbooks for children.  They were developed by Natalia Rubina and used for several years (before 1999) at a school in Petrozavodsk, Russia.  They were translated into English fluently by Irina Dolina, a Russian researcher living in Tokyo, and were posted in "TRIZ Home Page in Japan".  They are a unique and wonderful course material for children education in our new era of 'ever-changing world'.

1st Grade/1st Semester "Fairy Tales School"    (Jan. 30;  Feb. 28, 2001)

1st Grade/2nd Semester "Fairy Tales School"   (May 8, 2001)  

2nd Grade/1st Semester "Fantasy City"    (Jul. 17, 2001 ) 

2nd Grade/2nd Semester "Fantasy City"    (Sept. 11, 2001)  

3rd Grade/1st Semester "Planet of Unsolved Mysterious"    (Dec. 17, 2001) 

3rd Grade/2nd Semester "Planet of Unsolved Mysterious"    (Feb. 17, 2002) 

 TRIZ/USIT/CrePS Paper:  General Method of Creative Problem Solving: 'Six-Box Scheme' (Toru Nakagawa)  (Jan. 8; Apr. 12, 2015)

A talk presented for 60 minutes to a dozen of highschool students.  A general view of how to think and solve problems creatively is given in the demonstration of a case study 'How to make a knot with short string at the end of sewing'. A concise and nice class material of 20 slides.  Slides in English translation are posted (Apr. 12, 2015)

 


A list of selected articles posted in this site: 
those originally written for elder people but still suitable for younger readers of this page  [Part3]

Notes for teachers:  The articles listed in this section is written NOT in a way readable for children or junior highschool students (but probably OK for senior highschool students).  However, after some minor rewriting, they must be fine for children and highschool students, and hence they are good references as they are for teachers and parents. Some of these articles are written fully only in Japanese and just briefly in English translation.  I wish you to support this site by contributing your articles for young people.

*** This Entrance Page is composed of the following 3 Parts, in my intention.  [Part 1] An easy and consistent introduction for children and highschool students. (Articles are not ready.)  [Part 2] Articles good and readable for children and highschool students, among the articles posted in this Web site.  (There are several articles, but most of them still need to be revised for readability.)  [Part 3]  Articles having contents for children and highschool students (or on the education of them) but written to be read by students and adults. (A number of articles exist.) -- I know that the articles in my site so far have the writing style for Part 3 and that we need revisions to rewrite them for Part 2.  Temporarily, some articles are posted in duplicate in Part 2 and Part 3. (Toru Nakagawa, Apr. 12, 2015)

 

Each article is characterized with the marks in 5 different colors:   ( old or not classified)。
The  mark means a recommendation for this Entrance page. 
Hyperlinks to each article is shown with the icons: English HTML page, English PDF page, English brief introduction page, and Japanese HTML page.
In ( ) shows the date of posting/updating in the present site.

 

(A) General Introduction:  mind sets, etc.

Lecture Note: "Way of Thinking for Creative Problem Solving: What Are You Going to Do in Your College Life?" (Toru Nakagawa) (Jun. 19, 2000) 

A series of three lectures given to freshmen students at Osaka Gakuin University.  Encouraging students to think creatively in a wider scope on their life-time problems.]

Teaching Practices: Nakagawa's Seminar Class of 1st-year Students for Learning with "7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens" by Sean Covey (Toru Nakagawa) (Jan. 3; Mar. 11, 2010; Mar. 13, 2011; Mar. 6, 2012)

Records of my seminar class at Osaka Gakuin University.  "7 Habits of Highly Effective People" is a best seller book describing the importance to have a proactive way of life.  By discussing at the class on the texts written for teens and writing reports, I have guided the students in their report writing skills and their ways of thinking.

 

(B) Introduction to methods of problem solving

Lecture to Highschool Students:  How to Think Creatively in Technology Development (Toru Nakagawa) (Jun. 24, 2003)

A lecture to highschool students in 45 minutes.  I talked about the necessity of thinking creatively and of not solely relying on incidental enlightenment.  The 'Picture Hanging Kit' problem was used for demonstrating the way of thinking. 

  Introduction: "What is TRIZ? FAQ" (Toru Nakagawa) (Jan. 13, 2006)

Part 1 of the series "TRIZ: Creative Problem Solving Methodology for Innovation" published in the monthly journal "InterLab" in Japanese.  Part 1 is an Introduction to TRIZ for novices: What is TRIZ?, Information sources and textbooks, Basic approach, Thinking way for innovation, Penetration situations, Penetration in Japan, New generation of TRIZ.

Introduction: "What is USIT? FAQ" (Toru Nakagawa) (Jul 22, 2007)

Part 1 of a series of 5 lectures, "Introduction to USIT: A Simple Method for Creative Problem Solving" published in "Machine Design" Journal,  Aug. - Dec. , 2007, in Japanese.  (Short summary in English .)  This article (Part 1) explains the overall view of USIT in the Q&A style with the novice. (1) Introduction; (2) What is USIT? Its History of Development; (3) Information Sources and Textbooks of USIT; (4) Motive and Features of USIT; (5) Process of Problem Solving with USIT; (6) Practices in USIT; (7) Penetration Status and Significance of USIT. 

 TRIZ/USIT/CrePS Talk:  General Method of Creative Problem Solving: 'Six-Box Scheme' (Toru Nakagawa)  (Jan. 8; Apr. 12, 2015)

A talk presented for 60 minutes to a dozen of highschool students.  A general view of how to think and solve problems creatively is given in the demonstration of a case study 'How to make a knot with short string at the end of sewing'. A concise and nice class material of 20 slides.  Slides in English translation are posted (Apr. 12, 2015)

 

(C) Simple examples of solving familiar problems

Everyday-life Case Studies of TRIZ/USIT (1) How to Fix the String Found Shorter Than the Needle Toru Nakagawa) (May 9, 2006)

A case study based on Tsubasa Simoda's Bachelor Thesis at OGU, and published as Part 5 of Nakagawa's article series "TRIZ: Creative Problem Solving Methodology for Innovation" in the InterLab journal.  Written in Japanese.  This demonstrates a standard process of using USIT.  

Everyday-life Case Studies of TRIZ/USIT (3) How to Prevent the Staples from Being Crashed (Toru Nakagawa) (Jan. 7, 2007)

A case study based on Kazuaki Kamiya's Bachelor Thesis at OGU, and published as Part 13 of Nakagawa's article series "TRIZ: Creative Problem Solving Methodology for Innovation" in the InterLab journal.  Written in Japanese.  This case study finds the root cause in an unexpected observation and uses the Smart Little People (SLP) method effectively. 

Problem Solving in Everyday Life: On Methods and Tools for Weeding (or Removing Weeds)  (Takahisa Miyke, Toru Nakagawa)   (Nov. 18, 2011)

'Removing weeds' has been a much labor work since ancient days.  It appears to be a simple problem at first sight, but actually is a complex problem containing a diversity of requirements.  Thus in the present study we have considered to reveal the problem in various aspects, such as purposes, goals of finishing, problem situations (e.g., ground, sorts of weeds, distributions of crops and weeds, etc.) and have thought of a variety of methods in the aspects of their intentions, tools, mechanisms, etc. and have evaluated the methods.  Before trying to solve a specific problem, we need to understand the structure of the problem from such a variety of aspects, regardless of using TRIZ or not. 
This work was based on Miyake's Bachelor Thesis at OGU and was presented at Japan TRIZ Symposium 2011 and at ETRIZ TFC 2011.

  Education with TRIZ : Let's think in Little People’s and Person's Worlds! : A Summer Homework by Son and Father with TRIZ (2nd Time) (Kai & Katuya Miyanishi) (Sept. 25, 2011)

This presentation is Miyanishi Family's 2nd report, done by Kai (13 years old) with the guidance by his Father. They try to understand how a screw nail is magnetized with a magnet, in the words familiar for the son; thus they used the personalization, or animation. Human relationships, such as getting good friends with or giving an influence on other, are considered as the hints for designing physical experiments. 
Presented at Japan TRIZ Symposium 2010.

  A Collection of USIT Case Studies (Toru Nakagawa)   (Jun. 26, 2015)

Case studies published so far in different places are collected here, and are shown in a table.  Individual case studies are described in full extent in a consistent format according to the USIT Manual .   Each case study is shown individually in an HTML page containing four slides (3 introduction slides and 1 overview summary slide in the 'Six-Box Scheme') and in a PDF file of the whole set of slides. 

No.
Theme

Features

 
Case Study described by:
1.
Sewing

How to fix a string shorter than the needle

Whole USIT Process is well illustrated for a familiar problem

Toru Nakagawa
 (May 25, 2015)
(Jun. 26, 2015) 

2.
Stapler

How to prevent a staple from being crashed

A familiar problem was solved by finding the real root cause and by using the SLP method

Toru Nakagawa
 (May 25, 2015)
(Jun. 26, 2015)
3.
Toilet

Saving Water for a Toilet System

Example of catching big problem in daily life as physical contradiction, and solution

Toru Nakagawa
 (May 25, 2015)
(Jun. 26, 2015)
4.
Picture

Picture Hanging Kit Problem

A standard USIT Case Study on a familiar problem, easy to understand for everybody and yet deep in thoughts

Toru Nakagawa
 (May 25, 2015)
(Jun. 26, 2015)
5.
Porous

Increase the Foam Ratio of Porous Polymer Sheet

A real problem in the field of chemical engineering is solved with the Particles Method

Toru Nakagawa
 (May 25, 2015)
(Jun. 26, 2015)

 

(D) Documents

 

Top of this page For Children Selected Articles General Introduction Problem Solving Methods Examples Documents Japanese Page

 

General Index  (A) Editorial (B) References Links News & activities Software tools (C) Papers, case studies, articles, Lectures, course materials (D) Forum General Index 
Home Page New Information   for children and highschool students for students and the general public for engineers (introduction) for Practitioners Publications: "TRIZ Practices and Benefits" Series Search in this site Home Page

Last updated on Apr. 14, 2017.     Access point:  Editor: nakagawa@ogu.ac.jp